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and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the devel
in the u.s. intelligence community and had many high ranking positions in it, including executive director, director for the cia, and his final position was national intelligence officer for the near east and south asia where he provided analytical support. and he was a visiting fellow at brookings in the year 2000, and as a reserve officer in the u.s. army, and has also been publishing externally important literature the last few years since retiring from the government. so i will step out of the way now. .. >> what are the prospects for a new president achievement anding a peace setment between israelis and palestinians? i believe, unfortunately, that they are not very good. by a fair settlement i mean a two-state solution, a palestinian state on comprising gaza and the west bank with some modern negotiated land swaps with control of its border, its borders, its water resources, its air space. something similar to the clinton parameters of 2000. i believe that this outcome more than any alternative would satisfy the core needs for security and self-determination of both israelis and pale
at 8 on c-span. later, the candidates hoping to represent arizona's 9th district in the u.s. house, democrat kirsten and steven later here on c-span2. >> what is the dinner, and how did it come about? >> so the al smith dinner is the most famous that presidential candidates show up every four years, and they show up, democrats and republicans -- i mean, it's really a memorial dinner for smith, and i think it's the thing that if anyone heard al smith's name at this point in time, that that's where you heard about al smith unless you hang around these hallowed halls. it's his lasting legacy, the place where the name gets out. it's held every year, not just every four years. prominent figures come in, it's a memorial dinner, a catholic charity dinner. people get together to assess the legacy of al smith and presidential candidates always especially to crack jokes about each other. >> in fact, they show up together most times, show up both the democrat and republican nominees show up together. we want to show you some of the past al smith's dinners. >> might i ask if senior clark comes
. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but that created in hand and triumphalism and survivalism that very muc
as 2006, and the reason is this. in -- after the u.s. invasion of iraq which syria posed, and syria was turning a blind eye cannot help but the hottest, there is a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say that that there are next on the hit list so there would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level official told me the wrong, of course were helping. you know why? we wanted you guys to kill them. we don't want them in our country. when you survive that, particularly after the assassination, that was blamed on syria but most of the national community. the pressure just escalated exponentially after that. people work in late 2005 counting the days for the gasol regime. syrian expatriates, organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that. in that thing that really created in him a sense of triumph and some and survivalism that very much informed his view of the world and response to the uprising in march 2011 because it instill then him the sense of destiny, righteousness, that he survived the best shot the west could t
necessarily lead to an increase in the importance of emissions of the navy and air force. the success of the u.s. and persian gulf war, the first persian gulf war the experience shock at the synergistic way in which the u.s.-led coalition spectacularly applied technology to the modern warfare. the fourth key driver has been the incredible development of the chinese economy that has allowed for and paid for the more than sevenfold increase in the chinese defense spending over the two decades. so, the pla today is a force that continues to emphasize its traditions, but also it has new ones. as we know, president hu jintao has talked about the historic missions which both reiterate the old and talk about the role of the global setting. the only part of which applies to the land forces as they've been increasingly participants in the u.n. peacekeeping operations. there's been some important developments in technology for the ground forces, particularly the two most important are the and provide in the tactical ability of the pla land force which is to say we now think there are less than five divisi
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq which syria opposed, and syria was turning a blind eye to cross into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there was a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to fail and they thought they were next on the hit list so they would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level syrian official told me later on, he said of course they were helping iraq. we wanted our guys to kill them. that is why we went into iraq. we wanted to get them out and get them through and you guys would kill them. and when he survived, particularly after the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february 2005 that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria. people in late 2005 for counting the days when the assad regime, there were syrian expatriates and organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that and i think that really created in him a sense of triumphalist and survivalism that very much infor
. >> thank you. thanks to having us again and again. i'm a u.s. correspondent for swiss newspapers but i have a question for you, henry. you haven't mentioned the governor of ohio at all in your analysis. was that on purpose or you don't think he plays a role? >> i've never found that governors matter a whole lot in presidential races. they don't poll states along with it. they can help of volunteer but their stamping or their popularity almost never actually comes over. the one thing i should've mentioned, i didn't though, is that the case it raise from two years ago is a good indicator. made ronnie's weakness. which is that john kasich after he left congress came from an investment bank backer and accuse running against somebody, before he was governor, was a representative from that west virginia part of ohio, and they rent a class warfare campaign. it was eyes on the side of the working class man, he comes on the site of the wealthy. and kasich in the atmosphere by 2010 only won by about two points. and if you look, he did much better in the affluent suburbs than he did in working-class a
in the long run they do compound as i described, look at the u.s. versus europe and japan. ice ice assist in the day, 26 -- california greater 26 of the top 500 largest companies in the world. europe has created one during that timeframe going back to the 1970s. why is in europe and japan able to produce the kind of innovation, the kind of growth, the kind of employment and the kind of middle-class became wages that the u.s. economy has produced? often people say we have entrepreneurialism in our blood, but we didn't grow our economy faster until 1992 when the commercialization of the internet. if anything our productivity was growing slower than theirs was. our product movie -- one and a half of this two-pointer coming from innovation. they move from one and half to two, to one, to one and a half. i just don't think that god blessed america with entrepreneurial blood. i think we earned it the old-fashioned way. will work harder, to more risk, made more investment if you count the salary of thinkers and innovators as part of what investment is, which our manufacturing accounting doesn't.
it vulnerable to a critique of morals. throughout the first quarter century of u.s. independence britain's and americans had chased each other about questions about population, its regulation, its limitation, its optimization. even as white americans claimed to need enslaved americans and african-americans to their labor force they coveted indian lands to cover the nation's people. british interfered with and criticized u.s. plans on both counts. on the continent british continued to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties to native americans supporting the rival population from who the united states perceived the greatest threat. on the ocean britain controlled atlantic shipping forbidding the atlantic slave trade after 1807 and harassing u.s. merchant vessels. meanwhile at sea britain's traditional goal of population limitation because usually british it fought on their small aisle, their main worry was too many worry but on the seas the royal navy needed every hand it could find on deck. the consequent british practice of boarding american ships to round up having a bound british seame
to con convenience the debate to discuss a topic that's quite critical and the u.s. china relationship is definitely most strategic bilateral relationship. tonight's program will include 90 minutes of unintrumpted -- uninterpreted of key u.s.-china relations, and then we conclude with a question and answer period that would be questions collected from all of you, and as well as audience from around the world, twitter, e-mail, and live stream. the format we have this evening is based on the guidelines published by the commission on presidential debates, and there are two sections of questions. professor, one of the co-moderators, will address the first with six questions, and the other co-moderator direct the questions in the second section with six questions. speakers each have a minute and a half to respond followed by a 30-second rebuttal, and in keeping with proper debate decorum, i want to review a number of rules of engagement. first of all, please take the time now to take out your mobile phones and anything that makes noise and switch to the silent mode. what you can do secondly
under the obama administration the u.s. experienced a morbid of the infrastructure of the economy, the public sector become a manipulative force intervenes in the financial sectors with gowrn tee that attract talent and -- [inaudible] >> the worst this is the grain cast of the obama administration. and the epa now has a game control over [inaudible] has deemed a po lou assistant, danger to the environment. and co2 is the manhattan and keeps us alive. the circle of life and attempt to oppress co2 epitomizes the kind of antinature, antiimper prize spirit of the administration. it's the reason we need another supply side of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty." >> i would have changed quite a lot. i mean, there. all kind of detail that have changed. but i found that do try to change one thing would be to change everything. so, you know, you have in to a bunch of editorial work. instead of changing it, i essentially retained the old book and added 30,000 new words at the beginning and end. and revision of
saddam hussein. that only happened because of the u.s. invasion of iraq. but then even after the u.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to
to cambodia because the u.s. military is teaching cambodians how to speak english and they're going to be reading see spot run, or the updated versions of the sorts of things. so we are finding all over the world people want to learn english. >> host: so if people want to donate to your project, wooster website? >> guest: www..e. a g -- mid-bucks.org. >> host: we've been talking with stephen frantzich, this is his most recent book, someday. we are at the naval academy. this is booktv on c-span. >> in an interview at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, aaron o'connell talked about the history of the u.s. marine corps. it's about 15 minutes. >> host: welcome as part of the tvs university series and would like to visit campuses across the country and talk with professors who are also authors. this week, we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland. joining us is professor aaron o'connell, who is also the author of this book, "underdogs: the making of the modern marine
does anything that the u.s. government says, although we still say it. .. i remember when secretary clinton went on her first trip to china she had a forum with 16 women from different areas in china. was blogged, it was streamed, people would challenge the hiv/aids policy, incredibly brave women and secateurs clinton provided a forum for them to speak to a larger audience. these were the kind of things i think we can do. >> a question from right here in the room in the audience. president obama and governor rahm yo both said they want america to have a positive relationship with china but they must play by the rules. how well they pushed china if they think china is not playing by the rules, house specifically, dr. bader? >> how specifically will they -- >> push china if they are not playing by the rules? >> my last act in government, my last time around was second place in negotiations with a succession of the world trade organization. the world trade organization lays out in detail global rules. it was a 17 year negotiation for china, and it made extensive commitments. china used
in the west faster and cheaper and, therefore, using that to age, take away some of the u.s. market share. they have been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than what other countries around the world are making. they therefore substantial increase their share of the global solar panel market. the problem is they have not been so good in the domestic consumption side. chinese companies export 95% of the solar panels they produce. that's a big from for a lot of chinese citizens and ngos because there sank this is supposed to be about green energy but what we're getting is the factors that make solar panels and have a lot of pollution from the factory. and we are expert in the solar panels to the united states. to u.s. citizens have cleaner air but we do not. that's a really big problem. that's an old model. the old model. the new model would be if they cannot only create the manufacturing solar panel but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than what we have to. but also in staunton and consum
. there was a great panel. thank you to olivia. the first thing i always say it's about u.s. competitiveness because they think it all ties back to that. a next session, please come out jim doherty, a very good long-time friend of mine who is a fellow at the council on foreign relations is going to moderate. but organize this in conjunction with the council on foreign relations as about u.s. competitiveness. let's get it underway, the panel is fair. all right, jim, take it away. >> great to be here in detroit. first time in a while. i have to make it happen more often. so were going to have a nice conversation. we have to cover a lot of a lot of things in 40 minutes, so we're going to start right away. you can see the panelists, backgrounds, michael, paul and ted, great panel. i'm 40 minutes that we try to cover as looking at infrastructure, education and immigration, trying to look at it through the lens of technology and the role of urban centers and take a look at what the current state is in the united states in each of these things, what some of our best as competitors are doing and maybe a cou
and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about mus
, and now it's got her to the doorsteps of the u.s. supreme court. one thing i'd like to agree with ms. bowie on is where the rubber meets the road is k-12 # education. the reason we have a bold argument is the big gap in the academic qualifications and various racial groups coming out of high school and first grade for that matter, and that's where we should be pouring our energy and our resources, and i want to be clear, i am by no means saying that what students of color should not be at the best universities, but if they are admitted under similar standards or even slightly different standards from the other students, they are not harmed. it's great. the problem is not whether you're a student of color. it could happen to an athlete. if you were taken into a university, it's very much less prepared academically than your classmates, it's likely to harm you. if you are well qualified, you'll do fine. >> host: next call from sandy, cleveland, ohio, democrats' line. go ahead. >> caller: [inaudible] you don't have statistics to prove that students that are admitted are in the program f
. not in afghanistan but in the pentagon. the first wave of troops were u.s. marines and they wanted to bring their own helicopters, their own logistics units and didn't want to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar, and here was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was internal fighting within the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. in one other tale i recount in the book, we had some real serious infighting between president obama's own national security team and senior people at the state department over the whole question of, was it wise to try to broach potential piece take the taliban? and we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting in common purpose to try to achieve the president's goal in the country. >> host: who is summer koy. >> guest: she is a young american woman who -- there she is on the bottom right there -- who has extensive foreign development experience and p
on their campaigns. this interview was recorded at the u.s. naval academy. .. >> how does that dominate campaign coverage with issues or performance of candidates. >> host: start with the media. mitt romney 47% and barack obama guns and religion. >> this morning i just ran 47%. how many media outlets? dozen last one day wore one week or one month? guns was relatively short. three weeks. mitt romney 47% we have not seen the end of it. it is about one month. the stories drop-off but they are drug backend by opponents or events. i am sure coming out of the presidential debate they will wonder if he will respond to that. at issue which gaf we need to pay attention to. represent a character flaw or the incapacity to act? or just normal things? >> if they are hanging out in the public with the internet, youtube distributed more broadly and quickly is the hour cable -- archival capability we can see what barack obama said 1998. were mitt romney by the way not one bit of coverage of 47% in may. there was a fund-raising event but nobody pulled the story in may. not until the video popped up that came bac
in the u.s. come here in washington, d.c. wide? because they wanted to send a message. and for that matter, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today
quarter century of u.s. independence, britain and america chased each other about questions of population. it's optimization. even as white americans claim to need enslaved africans and african-americans to people of the labor force coveted to support ever-growing numbers of the nation's people. on the continent, the british continued to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties with native americans supporting the petition from whom the united states received the greatest threat to read on the ocean burton kunkel atlantic shipping forbidding the atlantic slave trade after 1807 and harassing u.s. merchants vessels. meanwhile burton's traditional goals population limitations because usually the british fought on their small islands of their main worry was too many people. but on the seas the navy needed every hand it could find on deck avoiding the american ships provoked enormous controversy. more so since the efforts could sweep americans into british mess. in the midst of such moral and political confusion both americans and the british made better efforts to maintain the better claim to v
joining us on booktv is professor brendan doherty of the u.s. naval academy. his most recent book is called "the rise of the president's permanent campaign". professor doherty, who was packard bell? >> guest: very good question. first, thanks for having me on. i might be in your program. pat caddell was an adviser to president-elect jimmy carter and he is noted for coining that transition memo he wrote to then president-elect carter, in which he said the key to being effective as president is a continuing political campaign. the notion was born man and popularized by book on political consultants when a teen 80s that has since become part of the common lexicon. >> host: how it should defend campaign? >> guest: it can be defined broadly or narrowly. the way i define as the extent to which a president focuses on electoral concerns throughout his term in office. by focusing the same presidential fundraising, and dedication to key electoral states to register them in office and the nature of electoral decision-making within the white house itself in recent administration. some people
frequently on numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man who has seen things happen and comments on them in, okay, in my humble opinion in a very reasonable and accurate way. he'll be followed by dr. robert freedman who is the peggy mire how far pearlstone professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and visiting professor of science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to both the u.s. department of state and the central intelligence agency, and he is the author of four books on soviet foreign policy and is also the editor, has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank, he is the strategic study institute's expert on soviet bloc and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline: russia's changing position in asia and co-editor of "the soviet military in the future." and he will -- the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen, my colleague here at heri
this is what works better in the u.s. however, having put the contentious idea in the table for all you people do care to shed, the reason i bring it out as i couldn't find polling data, but when i talk to tea party people, i would ask them point blank, so what if you could get very large reductions in spending than the prices that were so modest increase in taxes. would you take that question does not get deficits and government as a result. and they all said no. they were more allergic to raising taxes than they were to have in the government grow, which i thought was surprising. he saw that same dynamic by the way the republican primary debate. >> i think that's a great point you actually have seen polling data, but my interviews also cannot they typically will be shown as one person in particular said he actually would favor some sort of compromise there if it were guaranteed that the spending decreases would actually go into effect and typically at the reluctance to any kind of tax increase at all was because experience has suggested to them that tax increase is due in go into effect and
for the valerie plain unfair and again in the u.s. attorney scandal, said my 22 million e-mails were deleted and these are all government documents and they have never been found. so that was one thing he seems to have gotten away with. another thing was in 2004, smart tag played a central role in the presidential election. the secretary of each state, a part of their job is to oversee an impartial election. you may recall kathleen harris in florida was secretary of state of florida and she also haven't played a central role in the bush election and there is considerable controversy over that. well, a very similar thing happened in ohio in 2004, where ken blackwell was secretary of state. and again, he was supposed to oversee a fair and impartial election. but he happened to be cochaired the bush cheney reelection committee. he decided to tabulate the return for the 2004 election was secretary of state's computers weren't enough than they needed to get another set of computer service. so who did he go to both smart tack. smart tax roll raises an amount of very interesting questions. i went t
parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 1985. in may of 1985 i was nine and a half, going on 10. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your track? >> guest: well, i'd been separated from my father for eight years come this when he to mexico, my siblings and i convinced him to bring us back here because he wasn't going to come back to mexico and we didn't want to spend any more time separated from him. so we take him to bring us here. my father didn't want to
are focused on four issues; u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth -- which is tied, of course, to the first two -- and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one. we are very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city that has incredible potential that we would just love to help participate in that dialogue to help move that process forward a little faster. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all th
will be able to obtain records prior to an inspection, and fda can refuse drugs to the u.s. which were manufacturing for the substance that delayed, denied, limited or refused fda inspection. fda also now has the authority to put in place new processes to allow for the destruction of small mail packages of illegal drugs, which will deter purchases from illegal foreign internet pharmacies. under fdasia, communications with foreign regulatory agencies will improve. the definition of good manufacturing practices is more explicit, including quality systems and risk management. and registration of commercial importers is required. importantly, fdasia also requires notification to fda if a drug is stolen or counterfeited or if the use of the drug may result in serious injury or death. additionally as you've already heard, most likely for my colleagues who spoke earlier, fdasia provides for hands criminal penalties for counterfeiting and makes explicit fda's extraterritorial jurisdiction. counterfeit unadulterated medical products are not new problems, but we do have to address them in some n
we know well, in which the candidates attracted to a u.s. and new hampshire, and they submit their feet to the will of the people. and in a series of primaries and caucuses they are the chairs and nominees are selected. before jimmy carter, presidential candidates were chosen by insiders at the national conventions. and they could run in the primaries and the caucus but they didn't necessarily have to. it was an inside game. presidents now must raise a lot of money to take their money to their case to the people in the way that they didn't need to before. and in terms of the travel and the president's focusing on the key states, you have presidents now who are key to the political success taking their case to the people and now that you're in the office, they have continued to do so as president.o in the book i talk about examples of the presidential aide saying when a president needs to get back to his winning a game or does he want to do? he wants to go back to the people and the have and to do it in the key electoral states that better disproportionately in the coming ele
"negotiaing with iran." this interview is part of booktv's college series, it was recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland. >> host: john limbert, in your book, "negotiaing with iran", wrestling with the ghost of history, you talk about two crises in iranian history. what are those for crises? >> guest: two of them are actually prerevolution. two of them are post- revolution. the first was the crisis over the north west iran in area after world war ii. many people believe that that is where the cold war actually started. the second was the whale crisis of 1951 and 1953. in which the iranians attempted to exert control over major economic resources and the effort was frustrated in part because of a cia sponsored coup against the iranian national leader. the second occurred after the islamic revolution. the first was something that i was involved in personally. which is the hostage crisis in 1979 until 1981. the second was the crisis involving the hostages -- american and others -- those held in lebanon during the 1980s. a part of that, it was an incident that touched this ins
that time, my parents were gone working here in the u.s.. i looked at the mountains and think my parents were over there, on the other side of those mountains. that was that to me. >> host: originally, where were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico, and we didn't want anymore time separated fro
a supply line to the soviet union fighting for its life against nazi germany. the u.s. joined in that occupation after the u.s. joined the war and the russians did not leave as they had agreed to do it and instead set up a separatist movement in the northwest which first demanded autonomy from iran. that crisis was the first item on the docket of the newly formed united nations and of the first five resolutions of the security council starting in january of 1946. three of the five involve iran and azerbaijan. >> what role did the cia played in iran in the 1950's? >> well, peter, that's a good question. i don't have many details. many pyrenean friends of mine think i know more about the operations than i do of the cia. people argue over this endlessly what we do know is that the early 1953 president eisenhower inherited a difficult situation from president truman and gave the order to plan an operation inside iran to bring down prime minister mohsen def and to replace him with someone believed to be more in accordance with our interest. >> so did the prime minister get replaced
of an internet sales tax has reared up again and, in fact, the u.s. congress and many states are looking at this issue, and that's our topic this week on "the communicators." now, we want to start off by talking with the chairman of the california state board of equalization, jerome horton. mr. horton, california has recently changed how it manages or its taxation policies when it comes to the internet, hasn't it? >> guest: yes, peter, it has. it broadened the definition of what's taxable in california to include online retailers who meet certain criteria. >> host: now, you said you've broadened. how was it before, and now who is included? >> guest: prior to the law, the sales tax didn't apply to companies that had affiliates and worked through various different groups here in the state of california. the law broadened the definition of who actually qualifies to include those individuals. so now online retailers who have affiliates in the state of california who also have some form of brick and mortar either directly or indirectly working through other groups and partnerships and so fort
adopted, but i'm not sure whether the u.s. is moving in the same direction? >> it's an ongoing subject of conversation at the sec, and i guess i would have to respond, we have jointly proposed as dodd-frank requires with the banking regulatory agencies a set of executive compensation disclosure rules, including pullbacks and delayed payouts and so forth. and as you can imagine a lot of comment and those rules are not finalized yet but we're working with the other regulators to do that. the second thing i would say is the sec's approach any area of compensation has been a disclosure-based approach. if you look at the history of rule making in this area you can see ever greater requirements on public companies to disclose their compensation policies and practices, including as i mentioned rules we did shortly after i arrived that required compensation committees of boards to explain how their compensation practices may incentivize risk-taking and with the board is doing to manage that in synthesizing of risk so that the franchise and shareholders money is not unduly put at risk through t
to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are called government-sponsored entities, gics. for years described as private companies at the public mission of supporting housing or more simply, as mixed public-private enterprises. but in september 2008, both institutions failed financially. they were placed in government conservatorship, becoming quite unmixed just public corporations. the gics have had many problems of their conservatorship. ad was not part of that arriving by the year after conservatorship. but add was part of the solution. the risk of running freddi
place to go. >>> next u.s. candidates representative martin heinrich a democrat and former representative heather wilson, republican, square off in their third debate in one of the closest races in the country. the cook political report rates this race as leaning democratic. we picked this the date up right after the candidates opening statements. this is about an hour. >> good evening. i am, and welcome to kotb set the date. our sponsor is aarp. we are glad they are with us. this debate is being saimaa simulcast on a retial partner that would be 770, kklb-am. on and on the stage we have democratic candidate martin heinrich and republican candidate had their wilson and they are to replace john bingaman -- jeff bingaman who is retiring. both candidates have agreed to the debate rules to each candidate will have one minute to make an opening statement later they will have one minute for a closing statement. the candidates will be given one minute to answer each question and then 45 seconds each for the rebuttal. later the candidates will be allowed to ask the other candidate
's longest war shook the foundations of u.s. society. he reached into nearly every american home your military thri service, participation and protest movement, and evenizens through television and everydayt citizens and their leaders debated the merits this far-off place in southeast asia. over 56,000 american lives werey lost.istory she nation was torn asunder. a no wonder it doesn't seemthe ncient history. this feeling that the vietnam war had just transpired is even more culpable. although my parents, who are here today, rarely talked about vietnam, my father was, would admonish me, focus, focus pi on the present and future homework done.ece i was able to piece together what happened in 1975. i will make this sound like myrh parents are typical workingtesn immigrants, but they will only a share their story with how we made it to the united states yea 1975 when i told them that ith, was for a class assignment. finl in one fell swoop, i got my le homework done and the history. e when i land, when i was five not months old, my family come andn you have to understand that family in t
the theme of this panel, what you recommend in the future as far as how the u.s. should be interacting with those countries, another afghanistan scenario and also the possibility, hopefully we won't be intervening any time soon directly, however, what i am curious about is if that's intervention does not happen, what would be the ideal scenario given the other actors in the region and how they are influencing that? >> the sad reality is this is one of those situations where there is no ideal scenario or even a good scenario. that is what i was alluding to when i opened my comments by saying there are situations where there is no good solution. i would commend, some of you may have read a piece by my friend and colleague in the washington post in which he makes the point that the world and especially the middle east is an awfully messy place, in many ways in which the united states can't be expected, no u.s. president could be expected to solve and resolve everything. the blood shed in syria makes all of us shudder. that doesn't mean there is a u.s. policy option that will bring it to a
of our rebalance is to build a healthy, transparent and sustainable u.s./china defense relationship. one that supports a broader u.s./china relationship. as secretary panetta said when he was in china two weeks ago, a strong and cooperative u.s./china partnership is essential for global security and prosperity in the 21st century. and we seek to cooperate with china on a range of diplomatic, economic and security issues. including working closely with them to create -- build an enduring foundation for u.s./china military-to-military relations. recently our navies participated in a joint counterpiracy exercise in the gulf of aden off the coast of somalia, an area of strategic and economic importance for both countries. the exercise helped us to build trust and gave our sailors a chance to work together. and secretary panetta invited china to participate in the annual rim of the pacific exercise, which is our largest multilateral maritime exercise. so our relationship, defense relationship with china is an essential part of our rebalance. to foster security across the region, we're deepeni
it will be deprived of a historical fiscal and financial resource. the u.s. would be forced to try to support tripoli's attempts to assert central north other the entirety of the state, but i think the u.s. would find itself -- its libyan interlocutors unwilling or unable to help the u.s. or to advance u.s. agendas. and at the same time you could have a hulking, inintroverted, disinterested, disengaged algeria right next door. and this would be a very negative she their yore for the entirety of north africa. but i'm perpetually the optimist, and i don't like the chick l little role. i think there are a lot of chicken littles here in d.c., and the sky's always falling. so what if in the happy circumstance none of these scenarios come to pass. where does the u.s. fit in? i think there's a real potential for the u.s. to build new relationships with algeria. it's going to have to be predicated on algeria being in the driver's seat. algeria will never be anybody's proxy. algeria has enormous potential that i think the u.s. can help it realize both domestically and economically. if algeria manages the poli
energy into strengthening both the u.s. bilateral relationships with the maghreb company -- countries and the ties between those countries themselves since she came into office four years ago. her term as secretary of state follows a distinguished career in public service as a lawyer in arkansas, as the first lady of the united states and more recently as a united states senator from the state of new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped the gallup poll for 16 years as the most admired woman in the world, besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we are extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant who is engaged in these challenges day in and day out, who cares deeply about the issues and how they affect americans interest and who believes in an even brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming the secretary of state, the honorable hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> thank you. [a
. and the u.s.' counterterrorism policies in north africa are highly unpopular. so we need to get better and smarter about how we do counterterrorism, and i think a big piece of it is economic. counterterrorism, i don't know how much it's shifted because they were really smart about it early on, but then the resources put sort of more on the military side even though it tried to be more socioeconomic early on. i think the we need a much more holistic approach to counterterrorism. >> thank you, dr. alexander, for your question. i think that one of the reasons for this situation in northern mali is precisely the issue of refugees. i happen to have recorded some of the what happened, i mean, as a spawn of libya, of what happened already since the return of the, of the tuaregs who were serving in thegy gaze under gadhafi. in may 284,000 fled northern mali. about 60,000 went to -- [inaudible] 61,000 went to mauritania. you were talking about the neighborhood, what's going on. algeria, i think, has 15,000 or 20,000. so if the situation if there is an intervention, you know, as the french are w
and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are substantially increased their share of the solar panel market. the problem is they've not been so good at the domestic consumption side. chinese companies export 95% of the solar panels to produce that is a big problem for chinese citizens and environmental ngos because they are saying this is about clean energy cleaning up the environment but we are getting the factories that make solar panels and have a lot of pollution from factories and then exporting solar panels to the united states so they have cleaner air but we do not and that is a big problem. that's an old model that china has been following the past few decades. the new model would be if they can not only create the manufacturing solar panels but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than we have here and also installing them and consuming them at
with the u.s. global leadership coalition. one demographic i don't think has come up so far this morning is 65 and older. could you talk a little bit about how you are seeing polls of that demographic change and to the extent that this election of paul ryan and his liabilities on medicare is becoming a problem for the romney campaign and perhaps even in some of the senate raises? >> who would like to go first? >> well, in 2008, if we just look at the seniors and the exit polls president obama lost seniors by eight points and then in 2010 midterm elections, with the exit polls aggregated the exit polls for the senate raises democrats lost by 20 which was one reason why -- and then looking to our nbc "wall street journal" poll the president was trailing seniors by close to the 2008 margin, nine points and look, i think that you know, i think paul ryan is a very smart person. i think clearly the romney team must feel he is a qualified to be president president of the united states. is a democratic analyst, to us it just sort of reignited the whole medicare issue because you know we have spe
. hope for better u.s.-china relationship. so your remark is bringing forth the sentiment that you expressed, what you did. now, the open china to you and president nixon made in early 1970s was not only a turning point in history, but also that the event has changed our lives, the millions of people, millions of chinese, chinese americans and americans. thank you very much, dr. kissinger. [applause] >> now, one of the things you talk about is -- [inaudible] who have developed a broader division, just issued envision. we have to have a deep understanding of chinese politics, society, behavior, political system, and also it's confirmation. this is, let me come to the question you raised. it's a better question, but i really disappointed not at this point with the chinese leadership, but rather its point with the foreign china communities. and also disappointed with social media. constantly upset. it's fair to say the chinese government said several times the press conference and also said -- [inaudible] that vice president xi was injured in his bed. so i think that's enough. because
who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia officer antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so
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